31 Healthiest Foods For Your Dog (And The 13 You Need To Avoid!)



Peanut Butter (Conflicting Information PLEASE READ CAREFULLY)

This is a favorite treat of many canines, and has been for years. It is recommended by many professionals as a safe snack, and is added to hundreds of dog treat products. Not only is it a good source of protein, but it also contains heart healthy fats, vitamin B, niacin, and vitamin E. But some information shows that it could be dangerous to dogs as well as humans. While I have not heard of any dogs having an issue with peanut butter, I will share what I have found.

It is said that most peanut butter contains Aflatoxins, that are naturally occurring mycotoxins produced by a fungus called Aspergillus. These are carcinogenic, cancer-causing substances shown to be toxic to the liver, and are known to cause liver cancer in laboratory animals.

According to Dr. Andrew Weil,

A few years ago, Consumers Union looked into the question of aflatoxins in peanut butter and found that the amounts detectable varied from brand to brand. The lowest amounts were found in the big supermarket brands such as Peter Pan, Jif and Skippy. The highest levels were found in peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores.

BUT, before you break out the Jif for you or your dog, you need to know that another issue with the cheaper brands is that they contain trans-fatty acids. These are one of the most toxic food substances today, due to the highly toxic process that makes foods more stable, and sit on shelves for a long time. Hydrogenation is the process of taking a plant oil, adding a nickel catalyst, heating it, and then removing the nickel catalyst. This results in a highly toxic fat that causes diabetes, heart disease and chronic inflammation. If the peanut butter you buy contains trans fats, hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils in the ingredients don’t buy it!

And if trans fats aren’t bad enough, roasting nuts can also cause the fats in peanuts to go rancid. So if you are going to buy peanut butter, at the very least, make sure it’s raw and doesn’t contain hydrogenated fats. But of course, you still may have to deal with the aflatoxins. One way to help avoid the effects of aflatoxins, is to buy Earth Balance Creamy Coconut & Peanut Spread, as the coconut oil in the peanut butter should kill the fungus that causes the aflatoxins.

Studies have found that coconut oil can kill viruses that cause influenza, herpes, measles, hepatitis C, SARS, AIDS, and other illnesses. It kills bacteria that cause ulcers, throat infections, urinary tract infections, gum disease and cavities, pneumonia, and gonorrhea, and other diseases.  It also kills fungi and yeasts that cause candidiasis, ringworm, athlete’s foot, thrush, diaper rash, and other infections, and even kills tapeworms, lice, giardia, and other parasites.

Lean Meat

Think chicken, beef, or pork with no visible fat and no added sauces or seasonings can be a great training treat or can add a bit of good-quality extra protein to your dog’s diet. Lean meat is an excellent, balanced source of amino acids, the building blocks of muscle in your dog’s body. Meat is also a great source of B vitamins (Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, and Cobalamine). These vitamins are involved in energy metabolism in the body. Meat also makes a good meal replacement if you’re in a pinch and out of dog food.

Liver

Used in moderation, this meat is also a good choice and available freeze-dried in most pet stores It makes a great training treat, that you can also buy fresh in the grocery store to feed at home. Fresh liver can be cooked and then baked to make your own liver treats. Liver is an excellent source of B vitamins, Vitamin A, and Vitamin K. It is also a great source of iron. Too much liver may be toxic to dogs because of its high vitamin A content, so it is best to limit the amount of liver fed to your dog to not more than 1 g of fresh liver/Kg body weight per day.



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